Vips Vmacs and Other Addressing Concerns

When you lay out the design of a cluster, you can account for IP addressing to rear its head because, without logical addressing, how would your services work? In this section, you look at the design methods you should consider with both logical and physical addressing of your clusters. You can see an example of a virtual IP in use on a cluster in Figure 1-18. In each chapter of this book, you'll look at it over and over with each cluster and service you configure but, for design purposes, you need to be aware of what you'll need to consider overall.

You must be aware that TCP/IP is the only protocol you can use with the Windows 2000 clustering and load-balancing solution. That said, it's important for you to concentrate on planning your TCP/IP addressing architecture early in the design. When we get into the actual configuration during the next chapters, you'll see why this is so critical, but you need to make sure you have such addressing accessible. I once had a situation where, in the design and planning stages of an Internet-accessible design that used publicly assigned IP addresses from the Internet service provider (ISP), I realized someone might not have taken that into consideration with the block the company had

Cluster A

Cluster A

IP address 10.0.0.2

Network client

Client accesses resource via 10.0.0.1

IP address 10.0.0.3

IP address 10.0.0.2

Network client

Client accesses resource via 10.0.0.1

IP address 10.0.0.3

Figure 1-18. Viewing cluster access via the virtual IP

been given. They were locked down to the few addresses they already had and they had absolutely no room to grow. To build forward from that point, we had to get the ISP involved to get a new block with much more capacity. You need to get that high-level view of design finalized before implementing the technology. An example of a load-balanced solution while considering IP can be seen in Figure 1-19.

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