Client for Microsoft Networks

Client for NetWare Networks (or Client Service for NetWare) These two client-software collections appear in Figure 2-1. which shows the General tab of a Local Area Connection object in Windows Server 2003. These two different sets of client software provide access to two different sets of network resources. Figure 2-1 The General tab of a Local Area Connection object from a Windows Server 2003 system. Figure 2-1 The General tab of a Local Area Connection object from a Windows Server 2003...

Every Network Map Tells a Story

Earlier in this chapter, we introduce you to most of the basic principles involved in designing and building a network. By now, you have a pretty good idea about how networks work. As you spend more time around networks, however, you may realize that what they do isn't nearly as important as what you know about what they do. Whether you wrestle with networks only occasionally or full-time, you may discover that there's nothing like a network map to help you find and keep track of things on your...

Info

Published Certificates Member Of Dial-in Object Security Envioriment Sessions Remote control Terminal Services Profile COM* General Address Account Profile Telephones Organization First name ast name Display name description Off e Computet name (pie-Windows 2000) FRIEDBANANASAND The foHowtng user or group can ion this computet to a domain. User of group f Allow pre-Windows 2000 computers to use iNs account r Allow pre-Windows 2000 backup domain controllers to use this account Advanced Security...

Make a Network Medium Happy

A happy network medium has nothing whatsoever to do with a TV psychic. Rather, finding the right network medium means implementing network cabling that won't cause bottlenecks. Depending on whether you're building a network from the ground up or starting from scratch, you may need to take a different approach to evaluating cabling options for your network If you step into a job where a local area network (LAN) is already in place, cabling is probably in place, too. Evaluating the type,...

To network ID or host ID that is the question

An IP address consists of two components a network ID and a host ID. The network ID identifies the network segment to which the host belongs. The host ID identifies an individual host on some specific network segment. A host can communicate directly only with other hosts on the same network segment. A network segment is a logical division of a network into unique numeric network IDs called subnets. A host must use a router to communicate with hosts on other subnets. A router moves packets from...