Terminal Services Home Directories

You are also able to configure your user accounts to use separate home directories when logging on to a terminal server. As you learned in Chapter 3, the system uses the user's home directory as its ROOTDRIVE and stores application compatibility files there. The intention of using a separate home directory when logging on to a terminal server was to keep these files out of the user's Windows home directory.

The problem is that if your users store their documents in their Windows home directory, they will need that same directory available when logging on to a terminal server. If you define a Terminal Services home path, it will be mapped instead of the Windows home path during logon. If you do not define a Terminal Services home path, the Windows home is mapped as usual, but ACD files will be written to it. This behavior poses quite the challenge.

If you are in a smaller environment, you can take advantage of My Documents folder redirection to centrally store your users' documents, and reserve the home directories for application data only. But folder redirection is based on security groups, so it does add administrative overhead in larger infrastructures.

Most users will not mind the few directories that ACSs create and will simply ignore them. If you want, you can modify your ACSs to flag these directories as hidden to keep them from bothering your users.

^ As with profiles, if you do not define a Terminal Services home path, the system will use the Windows home path instead. So if you want to use the same home directory for both workstations and terminal servers, simply leave the Terminal Services home path blank.

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