License Server Group Policy Settings

WS2K3 includes several Group Policy settings to control terminal server licensing. With these settings, it is easy to centrally configure license servers and maintain consistency in the environment (Figure 1.14 shows the available settings in the Group Policy Object Editor) Figure 1.14 The License Server Group Policy settings. Figure 1.14 The License Server Group Policy settings.

TriCerat

The next section of the script is designed to create a ROOTDRIVE. The concept of the ROOTDRIVE was created because most registry keys can't reference environment variables. For example, MyApplication.EXE may have a registry value called UserTemplates that defines the path used to store user-modifiable templates. The best option for this path would be to use HOMEDRIVE HOMEPATH MyTemplates so that each user can be directed to his or her network home directory (if one exists) or to his or her...

Active Directory Users and Computers

Active Directory Users and Computers is the administrative tool used to manage OUs, users, computers, and groups in AD. Figure 4.8 shows the Active Directory Users and Computers interface. From this interface, you have the ability to not only manage the directory and the objects it contains but also quickly access the computer management console for computers in your domain. Active Directory Users and Computers t j Active Directory Users and Cornput _IComputers Container Default container for...

Usrlogoncmd

The first section of the USRLOGON.CMD script calls SETPATHS.CMD. Listing 5.1 shows this section. Call SystemRoot Application Compatibility Scripts SetPaths.Cmd If SETPATHS FAIL Goto Done Listing 5.1 The first section of USRLOGON.CMD. The SETPATHS.CMD subscript checks to make sure that the registry keys for the user's application environment are in place. The registry keys for the current user variables can be found in the Folders subkey, and the keys for all user variables are in the same...

Third Party Load Balancers

Although Microsoft NLB is robust, easy to configure and manage, and is free with all editions of WS2K3, there are many reasons to consider a third-party load balancer for your terminal server environment. Perhaps you need to distribute your servers across multiple subnets. Or you need more that 32 servers to support the number of users in your environment. Maybe you are using Session Directory and want to enable connection tokens so that you can hide the physical IP addresses of your terminal...

Install and Execute Modes

For registry and INI file mapping to work, the system must be in the proper mode for either application installation or execution. To switch the server into install mode, simply invoke the Add New Programs Wizard in the Add Remove Programs Control Panel applet. To switch back to execute mode, close the wizard. If you try to run a SETUP.EXE program from outside the Control Panel, the terminal server will correct you by sending the error message that Figure 5.4 shows. Figure 5.4 Attempting to run...

INI File Mapping

Before Windows 95, all settings for the system and applications were stored in INI files initialization files . Legacy applications will occasionally use these files today. Unlike the registry, which has separate areas for per-user and per-machine settings, INI files are global, so changes made by one user would affect everyone on the terminal server. In addition, most terminal servers are configured so that non-administrative users don't have adequate rights to make changes to these...

Configuring Session Directory

To take advantage of the Session Directory feature, all terminal servers in the cluster must be running WS2K3 Enterprise or Datacenter edition. The Session Directory server can use any edition of WS2K3. You can even create the Session Directory on one of the terminal servers in the cluster, although it is not recommended because that would prevent you from taking that terminal server offline for software installations upgrades without impacting the entire cluster. To configure Session...

Application Compatibility Scripts

Many applications don't take Terminal Services into account and store user-customizable components on the C drive of the computer. These components can include templates, macros, and dictionary files. On a workstation, if a user modifies any of these files, the change would also affect any other user that logs on to the same computer. But on a terminal server, changes would also affect any other users logged on simultaneously. This behavior can create problems when these files are in use by one...

Terminal Services Compatibility Flags

When you install an application, Terminal Services creates a compatibility flag registry key, which Figure 5.15 shows, that instructs Terminal Services about which type of program the application is MS-DOS, 16-bit, 32-bit . If you're installing a legacy application that will not run on Terminal Services, you can change this flag so that Terminal Services makes adjustments when the application is launched. Figure 5.15 The compatibility flags registry values. Figure 5.15 The compatibility flags...